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Are bumblebees violating the laws of physics?

Question by Translated Content | 05/05/2012 at 17:29

Again and again, we hear from various sources, that bumble bees actually physically should not be able to fly. But how do bees achieve to cheat the laws of physics, or is this myth simply not true?

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Everything that we observe, is also reality and subordinated to the laws of physics. No one will make something that violates these laws. Whenever we see something that apparently does not agree with the known laws of physics, this is a big indicator that something is wrong with our laws or we have an error in thinking. I deliberately speak about our laws, because we have identified all the known laws of physics in years of research. And that does not mean, that we have already explored all of the applicable laws until today.

Turning now to the example of the bumblebee: In this case, it was attempted to attribute the flight of bees to a simple physical formula. In this formula, the mass of the object, the surface of the wing, and the driving force appear, in order to calculate whether an object can fly. Substituting the values of the thick bumblebee in this formula, it comes out that the bumblebee should actually not be able to fly.

But what was not included in the formula, is that the bumblebee beats with the wings - the formula is in fact only suitable for stationary airfoils. Moreover, recent evidence indicates, that also the "fur" of the bumblebee have a lot of positive flight characteristics by plumping up the air in a certain way. Here we people, wanting to build aircrafts, probably learn a lot from the animals.
06/05/2012 at 21:27

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